Monsieur Salut writes: it seems an awful long time ago. Then, BBC Radio Newcastle’s brilliantly excitable Simon Crabtree had produced the Mother of all Goal Commentaries with his description of Carlos Edwards’s scintillating winner against Burnley to push us closer to promotion (achieved as champions with the 5-0 away win at Luton in the final game). It’s in the superb YouTube clip you see above.

But Ten Years After – OK, a little more than 10, since the Burnley  match was on April 27 and the Luton game on May 6 – we all need to have our spirits lifted. Then, we were in the hands of the Drumaville consortium, a group of Irish businessmen led by Niall Quinn as chairman and Seaham-born John Hays as vice chairman. I have seen the message Niall sent Drumaville’s surviving veterans after our relegation was confirmed this season; it was a model of dignity and pride.

Can the memory of that astonishing bottom-to-top transformation inspire whoever, ultimately, accepts the job of managing Sunderland and whoever is subsequently the club’s owner(s). We shall see. But here is how we reported on promotion 10 years ago …

 

Jake: ‘no mind-expanding drugs were taken in the making of this design’



It is the end of April 2007 and Salut! Sunderland is en fete
– and the celebrations started with a feast of goals, excitement and nerves, culminating in the Carlos Edwards screamer.

That was followed – at long last, as has been mentioned here and elsewhere – by some good coming out of Selhurst Park.

Many of us remember with gritted teeth that awful day a year after the first promotion under Peter Reid when a gutsy but desperately limited performance – against Wimbledon, then sharing the ground – saw us relegated once more.

It was a dreadful disappointment, at the end of a dreadful season when utter lack of ambition had it logical consequences. Fast forward to 2004 and the slightly unlucky 3-2 defeat in the playoffs – to be followed by elimination at the Stadium of Light in the second leg, thanks to an appalling refereeing decision that took the tie to penalties.

Yesterday, luck was on our side when Palace scored what seems to have been a comfortable 2-0 win over Derby, removing the need for us to win at Luton next Sunday.

The hard work had already been done on Friday night, of course, with that pulsating win over Burnley, and a winner that had the Lancashire radio commentator (Radio Newc**tle couldn’t handle the excitement and kept going off air) exclaiming: “Carlos Edwards take a bow.”

But with Derby out of the way, Luton becomes our promotion party. It will even be our championship party, if we win – as we surely should – and Birmingham lose or draw at Preston.

Roy Keane will be praising his squad in the run-up to that game, and so he should. The way they have turned around a season that was going nowhere is little short of breathtaking.

But then Keano will be urging them to one last burst of effort and application, to ensure that we have done all we can to grab that title.

And then the planning starts in earnest for next season.

Survival must not be the limit of our hopes for the return to the Premiership, but it will necessarily guide the earlier preparations.

However grateful we are to the players who have achieved promotion, the team has to be strengthened. But Keane doesn’t need advice from Salut! Sunderland on that – he has a good idea already who among the present players can make the step up, and who cannot.

The reassuring factor is that the Irish moneymen who have bankrolled the birth of the revival will be as anxious as any south-west corner season ticket holder to see its onward development.

The recruitment of Steve Bould was arguably Peter Reid’s finest stroke in plotting his second return to the Premiership with Sunderland in 1999, because of the terrific experience and solidity it gave us at the back. Stefan Schwarz brought a touch of midfield class and, of course, we had the Quinn/Phillips goalscoring machine.

And once Keano has added defensive and midfield quality, the absolute essential – despite the promise of Stokes and Murphy’s flashes of brilliance – is the acquisition of at least one first rate striker.

But the will is there to make sure we not only stay up but make yet another attempt to re-establish our great club as a real force again. The resources – from the promise of money to invest in players to Keane and his glorious start to management – should find the way.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Salut! Sunderland is written, illustrated and edited by – and principally for – supporters of Sunderland AFC. The site aims to be sufficiently literate and entertaining to appeal to people who do not follow SAFC but enjoy good football writing.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

SAFC vs Hull City Who are You?: (1) who will avoid the drop?

Jake: 'you may have seen this one before - M Salut just deleted the date'

Monsieur Salut writes: although we sometimes – OK, often – go back to familiar faces for the Who are You? […]

SAFC vs Hull City prize Guess the Score: the annual relegation scrap

Click on the picture above, guess the score and you may win a prize whoever you support

Oh dear, muses Monsieur Salut. The piece below was prepared before the Cardiff debacle. Will anyone be left to predict […]

Wrinkly Pete says: to be or not to be a borrower, that is the question

Wrinkly Pete(featured image)

John McCormick writes: It’s appropriate as we look towards Hull, well known Capital of Culture, that we get into the […]

Sixer’s sub’s soapbox: Grounds for pessimism after Cardiff

Salut Banner4(featured image)

Pete Sixsmith didn’t quite take the day off but the trip he made was a short one, only over the […]

Sixer’s Sevens. Cardiff leave us singing the Blues

Sixer's Sevens (featured image)

John McCormick writes: I didn’t think Cardiff City were anything special yet they brushed us aside. So what does that […]

The First Time Ever I Saw Your Ground: (part 2) Cardiff City and the Eponymous Stadium

Sixer'sSoapbox(featured image)

John McCormick writes: after 1971-2 it was another 30 years before I returned to Cardiff. This time I drove there […]